Read Taner Akcam’s A Shameful Act: The Armenian Genocide and the Question of Turkish Responsibility

February 9, 2010

Thank you to everyone who recommended that I read Turkish scholar Taner Akcam’s historical analysis of the Armenian Genocide, A Shameful Act: The Armenian Genocide and the Question of Turkish Responsibility. Mr. Akcam’s book is a significant contribution to the field of Holocaust and Genocide studies. Thank you, Mr. Akcam, for your research and for speaking out.

If you want to gain insight into the events that led up to the Armenian Genocide by the Ottoman Turks, I hope you will read A Shameful Act: The Armenian Genocide and the Question of Turkish Responsibility.

Here is a link to the book review that ran in the New York Times:

Turkey’s Killing Fields
New York Times | December 17, 2006

(P.S.: If you want to own the book, I’ve included a link to A Shameful Act, which is located under the Resource Links in the right column.)

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The Knock at the Door: A Journey Through the Darkness of the Armenian Genocide book review

January 11, 2010

I just read Margaret Ajemian Ahnert’s book, The Knock at the Door: A Journey Through the Darkness of the Armenian Genocide. I couldn’t put it down. This powerful and poignant book is the true story of Ester Minerajian Ahronian Ajemian, Margaret Ahnert’s mother.

Ms. Ahnert’s book relates Ester’s stories from her childhood in Amasia, Turkey (before 1915), her odyssey as a girl and young woman through the horrors of the genocide committed by the Ottoman Turks, and her ultimate escape to America from Turkey. This book is a fitting portrait of a real-life heroine, reminiscent of Celie in The Color Purple. Ester’s story is inspirational and important—and, The Knock at the Door gives us a window into a time we must never forget.

After sharing this remarkable book with one of my close friends, she had this to say:

“Margaret Ahnert brought flowers to her mother and took away true stories, unbelievable stories, that of the life of a young Armenian girl who had survived the destruction of three-quarters of the Armenian population of Turkey…Knock at the Door pulls the reader into twin realities, the horrors of loss and ongoing abuse, and amazement at the role luck, courage and the kindness of random individuals played in Ester’s survival. The book builds to a crescendo of stories played against two counterpointed refrains: ‘mortseer’ (forget) and remember, bravely carried out by two women, a mother and a daughter: remember, remember, never forget.”

To order the book or to learn more about The Knock at the Door: A Journey Through the Darkness of the Armenian Genocide, visit Margaret Ahnert’s website:

www.margaretahnert.com


Book Review: Cilicia 1909

November 7, 2009

Book Review: Cilicia 1909 – The Massacre of Armenians


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